Events at the MPIAB

Host: Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior

Energy saving strategies in the common noctule bat, Nyctalus noctula

Rado Seminar by Lara Keicher
In my PhD I investigate energy management strategies of male and female noctule bats across different reproductive stages. Using heart rate telemetry and a combination of laboratory experiments and field observations, I investigated torpor use strategies in captive female bats (Chapter 1) and compared torpor use behavior in captive and free-ranging male bats (Chapter 2). I will also present my plans and preliminary results from Chapter 3, in which I use high resolution heart rate data to investigate how free-ranging male bats budget their energy in different reproductive stages. [more]

Institute Seminar by Franjo Weissing

Behavioral individuality in Drosophila – The diverse routes to uniqueness

Over the past decade, several behavioral studies have demonstrated that idiosyncratic behavioral traits remain stable over long time periods. The stability of individually variable characteristics over time is often referred to as an animal's individuality or personality. Our work demonstrates that this individuality depends not only on nature or nurture, therefore genes and the environment, but also stochastic processes or chance play an important role. However, most animal studies have focused on individual variability in a single behavioral context, whereas it is well-established that animal behavior is highly context-dependent. It therefore remains an open question whether individual behavioral traits persist in different behavioral contexts. For instance, one individual might be more visually guided than another, or rely on one particular visual cue, or even one specific visual cue only under certain environmental conditions. We are using a combination of well-established and novel behavioral assays to investigate this question over a range of behavioral traits and contexts. We explore the persistence of behavioral traits under changing environmental contexts like illumination, temperature, and arena shape in both walking and flying Drosophila melanogaster. We can show that some individually variable behavioral features persist across different environmental contexts. However, the persistence of most behavioral traits varies considerably depending on which specific environmental parameters are modified. While some behavioral traits like the overall motivation to walk correlate across all tested contexts, parameters like walking speed, angular variability, or handedness persist only when the temperature or illumination changes. In contrast, these parameters are strongly altered upon changing either arena shape or modality of movement (walking vs. flying). In summary, our recent work shows the persistence or inconsistency of behavioral traits across different contexts, that we found independent of either genotype or gender. [more]

SARS-CoV-2 in Animals: What goes around …comes around

Institute Seminar by Jürgen Richt
In this presentation, our work assessing the susceptibility of different animal species such as cats, pigs, sheep, cattle and white-tailed deer to experimental SARS-CoV-2 infection will be summarized, and detailed descriptions of the clinical disease and transmissibility in these animal models will be provided. The results of these studies are critical: (i) for our understanding of the clinical course of SARS-CoV-2 in naturally and experimentally susceptible host species; (ii) for the development of preclinical COVID-19 animal models; and (iii) for risk assessment of SARS-CoV-2 infections in domestic and wild animals and the possible transmission to other animals and humans. In summary, a comprehensive understanding of animal susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 is crucial to inform public health and agricultural systems, and to guide environmental policies. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and responsible for the current pandemic. The susceptibility of domestic and wild animal species to infection is a critical facet of the SARS-CoV-2 ecology, since reverse zoonotic spillover events resulting in SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks in animal populations could result in the establishment of new virus reservoirs. Adaptative virus mutations in new animal species could also complicate ongoing mitigation strategies to combat SARS-CoV-2. In addition, animal species susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection are essential as preclinical models for the development and efficacy testing of effective vaccines and therapeutics. [more]

Institute Seminar by Jacob Höglund

Rado Seminar by Christin Albrecht & Fabienne Raabe

Rado Seminar by Christin Albrecht & Fabienne Raabe

Institute Seminar by Alice Auersperg

Join in-person or online on zoom! [more]

Rado Seminar by Andrea Költzsch

Rado Seminar by Andrea Költzsch

Institute Seminar by Louise Riotte-Lambert

Rado Seminar by Katherine Snell

Rado Seminar by Katherine Snell

Institute Seminar by Miguel Aguilera

Rado Seminar by Jenna Kohles

Rado Seminar by Jenna Kohles

Final Presentations of the VTK

Rado Seminar

Rado Seminar by Camila Calderon

Rado Seminar by Camila Calderon
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